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What is this technique called?

Oct 23, 2013, 15:24
Post: #1
What is this technique called?
            Hi, I do lots of youth sports photography and I try to learn as many techniques for editing photos to be able to offer nice pictures/posters of action shots. I have seen this technique surface over the past few months and I really like it a lot and would love to learn it before baseball starts at the beginning of the year. It doesn't look to be very difficult however I don't know what the technique is called to try and find a tutorial on it or to even request a lesson on it. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Oct 23, 2013, 18:44
Post: #2
RE: What is this technique called?
Could be a cross between a 'Dave Hill' effect
http://www.davehillphoto.com - scroll down to about halfway

and a bit of 'Dragan' effect
http://www.andrzejdragan.com/

That is for the foreground. The background then desaturated to greyscale.

There are methods of emulating these effects digitally, but truthfully there is a lot of hardware involved with these photographers.

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Oct 24, 2013, 02:45 (This post was last modified: Oct 24, 2013 04:27 by btraven.)
Post: #3
RE: What is this technique called?
I think the background in these shots is a different photo entirely, maybe a stock photo or something. Look at the feet of the football player, something's off there. Maybe the shots of the players are staged in front of a plain background, then digitally cut out and pasted on the b&w crowd shots. I don't know about the basketball shot, but I don't know how those guys do half the stuff they do.

I seem to recall that they used to stage baseball card pics with the player in a dramatic pose in front of a shot of a full stadium. And isn't there a trend now at weddings of some kind of photo booth or something. If it was a solid color, cutting out the player wouldn't be so hard. But what do I know. My version of Gimp still has that new car smell.

My guess is that by the time the season opens in March, this effect will be collecting dust along with Dragan, Orton, Lomo, HDR, High Pass, Freaky Details etc. in the discount bin down at the Photo Editors Second Hand Shop.

But I could be wrong. I thought Post-It notes were dumb, music videos were just a fad and that they'd never-ever-no-way-in-hell play an MLB season opener in a cricket stadium. What do I know.
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Oct 27, 2013, 11:59
Post: #4
RE: What is this technique called?
If you want the background black & white, make a composite of the subject and make the background black & white.

As for what the technique is called, maybe hdr toneing. I was able to create a close enough effect using the unsharp mask exaggerating the ammount with some radius(see pic)

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Oct 28, 2013, 03:24
Post: #5
RE: What is this technique called?
Interesting that (over)sharpening can get pretty close. Is it the radius? And how'd you select the guy, threshold mask? How would you have selected the b-ball dude?

There's also a bunch of options in G'MIC, including Freaky Details, Tone Mapping (fast) and YAG effect (whatever that is)--all under Details in the G'MIC menu--that produce a similar look.

But the problem Ofnuts identified still remains: separating the subject from the background. No matter how you produce the look or alter the background, you still have to separate the foreground subject and I can't figure out any way around that except using one or more of the selection tools. In other words, there's no way around learning to use the selection tools.

Not to worry, there's nothing to it, it's easy-peasey. Just pick one and fool with it with your mouse or on your graphics tablet until steam and a shrill whistling noise comes out your ears.
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Oct 28, 2013, 03:48
Post: #6
RE: What is this technique called?
(Oct 28, 2013 03:24)btraven Wrote:  Interesting that (over)sharpening can get pretty close. Is it the radius? And how'd you select the guy, threshold mask? How would you have selected the b-ball dude?
Exactly! For simple selections take a look at my inspired tutorials (PHollisPhotos)
Simple Threshold mask
http://gimpforums.com/thread-selecting-f...7#pid21197

Modified/ for more complex selection mask(busy background)
http://gimpforums.com/thread-help-with-a...5#pid21975

Quote:There's also a bunch of options in G'MIC, including Freaky Details, Tone Mapping (fast) and YAG effect (whatever that is)--all under Details in the G'MIC menu--that produce a similar look.

The mask is a semi-way around it, in that you're painting the selection in way. Then after you paint it, with the tool its automatic(fuzzy select Fuzzyselect, or by color Bycolorselect )

So unless there are hair in the subject that you want to extract, it shouldn't be too hard with any method (manual selection, mask painting or fuzzy select)

There is also a threshold option you can adjust with the select by color(Bycolorselect) & fuzzy select tool(Fuzzyselect).
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