Post Reply 

Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo

Aug 4, 2014, 22:23
Post: #1
Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
I've done quite a bit of photo restoration with GIMP but this is one problem that is frustrating me. I have a very old black and white picture of my great grandfather that has a silvery sheen to it. What process can use via GIMP to get rid of the silvery sheen?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Aug 4, 2014, 22:58
Post: #2
RE: Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
(Aug 4, 2014 22:23)tranquilsea Wrote:  I've done quite a bit of photo restoration with GIMP but this is one problem that is frustrating me. I have a very old black and white picture of my great grandfather that has a silvery sheen to it. What process can use via GIMP to get rid of the silvery sheen?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Hi tranquilsea,

Please attach the image to assist us assist you...
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Aug 5, 2014, 11:08
Post: #3
RE: Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
You should be able to take a photo of the original square on. But make sure the lighting is at an oblique angle.
Make sure there is no ambient diffuse light in the room. Or make sure there is a dark area around the picture and behind you that would otherwise reflect.
You will need to light the picture. You can use a desk lamp or flash gun. But be sure to snoot it with a cardboard tube to make sure no light bounces onto other items that will then reflect on the sliver.
It is best to get an even illumination of the picture. So light it from both the right and the left side. Or take multiple exposures or a long exposure, moving the lamp to light all areas evenly. You will need a tripod or fixed camera position for multiple or long exposures.

Some flat bed scanners can light obliquely.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Aug 6, 2014, 01:05
Post: #4
RE: Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
(Aug 5, 2014 11:08)ianp5a Wrote:  You should be able to take a photo of the original square on. But make sure the lighting is at an oblique angle.
Make sure there is no ambient diffuse light in the room. Or make sure there is a dark area around the picture and behind you that would otherwise reflect....

Easier said than done, can be tricky. I'd also recommend the angled photo technique for beginners, as it's not too difficult to correct any skew/perspective errors. Just angle the photo to the right or left until the shine is gone.

OR, for another slightly more advanced technique,
you could build a medium lightbox house to get consistent lighting, like this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBCHh2p7WP0

You'll want to change the exposure setting(if to bright) on your camera before you take the picture for best results

"In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than fear of failure." BC
[Image: 29uocaf.png]
iFS007 tut vids on YT ~ auto color B&W landscape tut
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Aug 6, 2014, 06:37 (This post was last modified: Aug 6, 2014 06:55 by ianp5a.)
Post: #5
RE: Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
I agree that lighting is not the easiest thing to do. But you would only need to take an angled shot if you are using on-camera flash. If you are using available or room lighting, angling it relative to the camera serves no purpose.

I suggest not using on-camera flash in this case as the picture is so shiny.

The light box shown in that video is not good. As light from all directions is guaranteed to reflect into the camera. An all "black" box would be better. The direction of the light is better limited and controlled.

Here's a diagram I found that showing the oblique reflection path 'not' entering the camera lens.

[Image: photo_good.jpg?iact=rc&uact=3&am...ctualImage]

But you could simulate this by using room light but blocking the light around the camera area so it only comes from the sides. Perhaps using a cardboard box painted black on the inside with a hole for the camera lens to poke in.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Aug 7, 2014, 18:20
Post: #6
RE: Removing the slivery sheen from a very old photo
(Aug 6, 2014 06:37)ianp5a Wrote:  If you are using available or room lighting, angling it relative to the camera serves no purpose.

The shine from the photograph is a result of a glossy photo paper reflecting the real world environment, not due to on-camera flash. ALTHOUGH, the flash would also cause a glare/shine.

(Aug 6, 2014 06:57)ofnuts Wrote:  
(Aug 6, 2014 01:05)iForStyle007 Wrote:  OR, for another slightly more advanced technique,
you could build a medium lightbox house to get consistent lighting, like this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBCHh2p7WP0

Won't work... the idea of a lightbox like this is reduce shadows, by making light come from all angles. Which means that one of these angles will be reflected back to the camera Smile

It was worth a shot xD
it worked for a friend of mine who does jewelry photography (physical objects though)

So I delve deeper for a solution and found this light defusing "Tipi" :
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/forums/...m#post7413

^_^ Good luck tranquilsea!
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Removing time stamp from photos? beat connection 1 231 Sep 3, 2017 18:49
Last Post: ythgilb
  Duplicate Photo Finder jsmith 0 186 Aug 13, 2017 18:04
Last Post: jsmith
  How to print a small photo centered on page sillycat41 4 444 Jul 7, 2014 00:44
Last Post: sillycat41
  Removing background and seperating main logo from words dragonsfire1981 4 501 Jun 26, 2014 22:08
Last Post: ofnuts
Sad How to make a photo like this mhktricks 6 501 Jun 9, 2014 11:06
Last Post: iForStyle007

Forum Jump:


GIMP ForumPortalArchiveContactTermsRSS