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Newbie question

Mar 11, 2011, 06:56
Post: #1
Newbie question
I have tried reading the tutorials online, but it seems to be filled with a lot of jargon I do not fully understand. All I want to do is have some fun putting faces from one photo onto another photo. I open two images as layers, and select the fact from the second picture I loaded.

I use the lasso tool to select the fact that I want to move.

Here is where I run into problems. I want the face to stay, and the rest of the image to disapear. I try to use the paint bucket, but It will only allow me to paint the face, not the rest of the image. When I try to use the move tool, the entire image moves, but the selection stays where it was and is no longer around the face.

This seems like it should be a very easy thing to do, but I fear my photo editing skills are basicly limited to what I have done in MS paint.

While I see if anyone can help me, I will continue to watch youtube videos and read more posts on here/other tutorials.

Thanks so much for the help.
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Mar 11, 2011, 08:23
Post: #2
RE: Newbie question
In the first image:
- Select with lasso tool(*)
- Image menu: Edit/Copy

In the second image:
- Image menu: Edit/Paste as/New layer
- Then with the move tool, move the face around.

(*) actually, the scissors tool is likely to be better (**)
(**) the foreground extraction can be even better

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Mar 11, 2011, 17:06
Post: #3
RE: Newbie question
(Mar 11, 2011 08:23)ofnuts Wrote:  In the first image:
- Select with lasso tool(*)
- Image menu: Edit/Copy

In the second image:
- Image menu: Edit/Paste as/New layer
- Then with the move tool, move the face around.

(*) actually, the scissors tool is likely to be better (**)
(**) the foreground extraction can be even better


Thanks so much, i was completely missing the image menu part.
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Mar 11, 2011, 20:15
Post: #4
RE: Newbie question
At that point you must have discovered that grafting faces and get a realistic look is a lot harder than you thought Smile

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Mar 11, 2011, 20:24
Post: #5
RE: Newbie question
(Mar 11, 2011 06:56)stu89pid Wrote:  I have tried reading the tutorials online, but it seems to be filled with a lot of jargon I do not fully understand.

About his part of your question: yes, there is some jargon to learn. Consider it like a shortand. Speaking of "layers" is quicker than speaking of "partially transparent images that make up the final image".

When someone "in the know" wants to explain something to a newcomer, evaluating the jargon level of the target audience is difficult.

Gimp and Photoshop are based on the same concepts, any introductory book for one is also valid for the other since they use the same jargon. The user interfaces are different, of course.

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Mar 11, 2011, 21:06
Post: #6
RE: Newbie question
Well they do not come out perfect, but it does not need to be so, I'm just doing it for fun. The blend and smear tools help smooth the transitions. Mainly the paths I haven't quite understood, but I shall continue to play around with them and see what I can learn.

I have never used photoshop either, so that is partly my problem with the jargon.
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Mar 11, 2011, 22:54
Post: #7
RE: Newbie question
The idea being the paths is simple: they are instructions to a paint tool, so instead of wiggling your mouse to put pixels on the image, you create paths and at some point, shazam! you stroke the path and you get nice straight lines and/or regular curves. A big advantage of paths is that they do not lose "quality" when scaled, rotated, sheared... so the trick is to plan sufficiently in advance to stroke the paths as late as possible. They also allow very reproducible strokes to you can superpose things perfectly. They can also be used to create selections.

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Mar 13, 2011, 06:54
Post: #8
RE: Newbie question
Ahh that helps clear it up. I have had some (limited) success learning to use the paths. That explanation was much more clear and succinct than the one I read from the tutorial. Thanks again.,
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