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Background image & ability to to type on image

May 10, 2011, 23:25
Post: #1
Background image & ability to to type on image
Completely new to Gimp and have read manual and remain confused and challenged.
Perhaps my 80 year old brain just cannot grasp what is a very basic task.
I can create a signature with image and text as in attachment, (not sure even did that) "DARN"but would like to be able to type directly on a jpeg or gif etc.
Please advise in a one two three fashion to assist my age challenged mentalityHuh
Thank you    
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May 10, 2011, 23:52
Post: #2
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
"like to be able to type directly on a jpeg or gif". What do you mean by this? Did you figure out how to use the Text tool?

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May 10, 2011, 23:55
Post: #3
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
Hi Tofts, welcome to Gimp Forums!

There is nothing special about a jpeg or gif as opposed to an image you create yourself from scratch (your signature is a jpeg). If you can open it in Gimp, you can put text on it anywhere you like. Simply open the image, then select the text tool and click on the image just like you did when creating your signature. Once you type your text you can resize it or move it around on the image. That should be about it, unless I'm misunderstanding your problem somehow.

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May 11, 2011, 00:08
Post: #4
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
Obviously not sir or I would not have posted
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May 11, 2011, 00:28
Post: #5
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
(May 11, 2011 00:08)tofts Wrote:  Obviously not sir or I would not have posted

I'm not exactly sure which of us your reply was meant for, but I can assure you that Ofnuts and I are both simply trying to help figure out your problem.

In your original post you at least implied that you created the signature image you attached in Gimp. Since that image has text in it, I hope you can understand my confusion when you say you can't use the text tool. If you could describe exactly what it is you're trying to do and in what way it isn't working, we'll do our best to help sort out the missing pieces.

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May 11, 2011, 00:53
Post: #6
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
I merely included that attachment to indicate what I did not want to do, that was
type text fixed to bottom or top image but rather on the image itself.
I can bring up text tool, I can drag drop image. I do not know how to format font size. It would be nice if someone would give me solution in 1, 2, 3, fashion. As an aside if possible to layer or make image transparent. Really sorry I am having or rather subjecting forum to my challenged comprehension. I thank you for your patience
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May 11, 2011, 01:15
Post: #7
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
(May 11, 2011 00:53)tofts Wrote:  I merely included that attachment to indicate what I did not want to do, that was
type text fixed to bottom or top image but rather on the image itself.
I can bring up text tool, I can drag drop image. I do not know how to format font size. It would be nice if someone would give me solution in 1, 2, 3, fashion. As an aside if possible to layer or make image transparent. Really sorry I am having or rather subjecting forum to my challenged comprehension. I thank you for your patience

Okay, that helps explain things. And if you can open an image, and know how to select the text tool you're already at least halfway there! I'll try to put together something with a few screen shots, but it may take a little while. I'll try to get it posted later tonight, but it might not be until tomorrow morning.

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May 11, 2011, 13:13
Post: #8
RE: Background image & ability to to type on image
For starters, Gimp has a highly customizable user interface. This is great for configuring everything just the way you want it to make your work easier, but not so good when trying to explain things and my screen looks radically different than yours. Where possible the images I've used I grabbed from the Gimp online documentation at Gimp.org. I'm assuming that your installation at this point is probably pretty much default, so it should look fairly similar to the images.

   

Above is the standard setup for Gimp. The window marked number 3 in the image is the "Image Window". This is where you open or create the image that you will be working on. The dialog box marked number 1 is the "Toolbox". This is where you select whichever tool you want to use to perform some operation on the image. The one we'll be interested in for right now is the "Text Tool" which is the one that looks like a large letter A. Marked as number 2 is the "Tool Option" dialog. This will change depending on what tool you have selected. This dialog contains the various options and setting that control the tool you have currently selected.

   

This image is what the "Tool Option" dialog should look like when you have the text tool selected. Starting from the top... "Font" is where you can select the font you wish to use. The font name is on the line to the right. Click on the square button and you will bring up a dialog that lets you scroll though all the fonts installed on your system and choose the one you want to use. Below that is the "Size", which obviously enough controls the size of the text. Use the up and down arrows to make your text larger or smaller (once you've entered some, we'll get to that). Usually the exact number here doesn't really matter. The text on the image will grow and shrink as you adjust this, so just work with it until the text looks about as large as you want it. One thing to note is that if you do need to set an exact size font, say to duplicate an existing logo, the default units here are pixels (px) and not points (pt) which are more commonly used in word processors and other text oriented programs.

You can also change the color of your text. The box next to "Color:" shows the current color that will be used. Click on that box and it will bring up a dialog that will let you select any color you would like. Keep in mind of course that doing things like making white text on a white background will lead to considerable head scratching while you try to figure our where your text went.

The four selections next to "Justify:" work just like they do on a word processor. You can set your text to be flush with the left edge, the right edge, centered, or justified. This is usually more important if you are entering multiple lines of text.

The three controls below this adjust the amount of indent on the first line of text, spacing between lines, and spacing between the letters. Unless your image has some special requirements, these should just be left at the default (0.0). The same is true for the three check boxes, for now just leave Hinting and Antialiasing checked and Force auto-hinter unchecked.

Okay, now that we've got the basics out of the way, let's open an image and put some text on it! I'm going to use the image you originally posted as my example because I've got a copy of it right here and its convenient. These same steps will work on any image that you can open or create in Gimp.

   

Start up a copy of Gimp, then go to File > Open and find the image you want to add text to. Next, click on the Text tool to select it. With the text tool selected click on your image. This should open up a dialog box like the one below.

   

This is the Text Editor, and is where you enter the text you want to appear on your image. Type in your text now. I'll start with something simple and easy and add "Gimp!" stamped across your image. On your image will be a rectangular area made of dashes. This is called the Bounding Box and it is the area on the image that will contain your text. It should grow to fit as you enter the letters, but we can always adjust the size later if needed. Note that this bounding box controls the size of the area where the text will be visible, it does not control the size of the text itself.

   
   

Now that we've got some text to work with, we need to go to the Tool Option dialog (the one marked number 2 in the first image) and make the text look the way we want it. Any changes you make here are visible in real time on the image. Change the font and you'll see your text in the new font... change the size and you can watch the text grow and shrink as you click and hold down the up or down arrow... change the color and your text will be in the new color.

   

As you can see above I changed the font to Arial Heavy, increased the size to 45 pixels, and made it red (Candy Apple Red in fact!)

   

If you now move your cursor into the middle area of your text, you'll notice that it changes into a four-way arrow. If you click and hold down the left button, you can drag the text around to position it wherever you want on the image.

   

Referring back to the first image I posted, the dialog marked number 4 is the Layers dialog box. In my example I ended up with two layers. The original image became the Background layer when I opened it. And any time you create some text it is automatically placed onto its own layer (notice the "T" in the icon denoting it as a text layer).

   

You will also notice a slider control labeled "Opacity:", this is how you adjust the opacity (or transparency) of any particular layer. Make sure the text layer is selected and adjust this until your text is as see-through as you like. I ended up setting mine to about 75% in the example.

There is just one thing left to do before we save the image. Since the jpeg standard doesn't know how to handle layers or transparency, you have to remove these from your image before it can be saved as a jpeg. On the main Image window, click on Image > Flatten Image. You'll notice in the Layers dialog that your text and background have been combined into one layer.

Now you can click on File > Save As, and save the image as a jpeg.

   

If you followed along with my example, you should end up with an image that looks like the one above. I hope this simple tutorial is what you were looking for and answered your questions. If I failed to explain something so you understand it, or I missed something you still have questions about, feel free to ask. I'm sure that I (or someone on this forum) will be happy to try and answer your questions.

And my apologies for abusing your signature. Rolleyes

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