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a question about printing

May 31, 2014, 23:32 (This post was last modified: May 31, 2014 23:36 by Esper.)
Post: #1
a question about printing
so i was under the impression you had to set your canvas up at the beginning of your project

and choose canvas size at a minimum of 300ppi for good printing results

but there is also Image -> Print Size

lets say my image is 811 x 917mm at 75dpi (2300 x 2600px)

can i change that with 'Print Image' to 194 x 220mm at 300dpi ??

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Jun 1, 2014, 01:05
Post: #2
RE: a question about printing
Yes... The only important thing is the size in pixels. You can change the print size or print definition freely, but you will always have the relation:
Code:
print size in inches = size in pixels / print definition in pixels/inch

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Jun 1, 2014, 01:13
Post: #3
RE: a question about printing
This is not in direct reply to your question--that's way above my skill level--but is a comment on ppi for good printing results. I get my stuff printed at a place called Mpix. I emailed one of their tech guys awhile back about dpi and print quality. He told me that their machines--the newest and highest-of-tech Fujifilm machines--output at 250 dpi.

I've never had detectable issues with anything above 220 dpi, so I no longer adhere to the 300 rule. If I have to crop an image down to 220 or so to get the composition I want, I don't worry about it but I try to stay above that. Also, I get my enlargements done on Fuji Pearl paper. The quality difference is noticeable and, to me, worth the little extra money. You may be printing at home, so I don't know if this is helpful info. I think the 3oo dpi rule is for the pixel-peepers who examine prints with a jeweler's loupe or something.
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Jun 1, 2014, 01:34
Post: #4
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 01:05)ofnuts Wrote:  Yes... The only important thing is the size in pixels.

thanks ofnuts !

so technically it doesnt matter at what dpi i set my canvas up ?
i think the default for Gimp is 75dpi

you read a lot, the default monitor resolution is 75dpi, but i also read thats a myth


@btraven:
thanks for the input, thats interesting to know !

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Jun 1, 2014, 07:34
Post: #5
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 01:13)btraven Wrote:  ... I emailed one of their tech guys awhile back about dpi and print quality. He told me that their machines--the newest and highest-of-tech Fujifilm machines--output at 250 dpi.

These are not your regular inkjet printers. Photographic laser printers commonly print at 100 dots per cm (254 dpi) but the result is equivalent to a much higher density.

some info here http://www.photobox.co.uk/content/quality/technical

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Jun 1, 2014, 08:46 (This post was last modified: Jun 1, 2014 08:53 by iForStyle007.)
Post: #6
RE: a question about printing
@Btavern: Yes you are correct; 300 dpi being the in-print standard rule.

I use to prepare layouts to send to a printing company for a small education newsletter with both black & white photos(300 dpi) & color(same also I think.)

At home I could also get away with a default of 72dpi (for some of my pictures)
In fact, most standard phone & compute cameras will default to 72dpi in my experience.

EDIT: I found a photo (2 megapixels @ 2048 x 1536 with a default of 314 dpi) unedited.
If your uploading an HD photo online for the sake of saving bandwith to your website or cutting loading speeds in half, you will rarely need the full resolution.
You should be fine using an image with 157 dpi or less, plus it will save on hard disk space Wink
That photo may only be 500 kbs in file size, but if you have a dozen of those same pictures(unedited) it can eat up alot of space!


There really is small discernment in noticeable details from 150 dpi and up.
So unless you're printing poster or newspaper page (thumbnails that need clarity) size, you rarely need the full 300 dpi.

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Jun 1, 2014, 09:05
Post: #7
RE: a question about printing
Quote:...At home I could also get away with a default of 72dpi...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdCHjCy1fKs

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Jun 1, 2014, 09:13
Post: #8
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 09:05)rich2005 Wrote:  
Quote:...At home I could also get away with a default of 72dpi...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdCHjCy1fKs

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Jun 1, 2014, 10:51
Post: #9
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 01:34)Esper Wrote:  
(Jun 1, 2014 01:05)ofnuts Wrote:  Yes... The only important thing is the size in pixels.

thanks ofnuts !

so technically it doesnt matter at what dpi i set my canvas up ?
i think the default for Gimp is 75dpi

you read a lot, the default monitor resolution is 75dpi, but i also read thats a myth


@btraven:
thanks for the input, thats interesting to know !

Yes the canvas DPI isn't really important. But it helps you create a picture of the right pixels size for its intended print size.

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Jun 1, 2014, 12:26
Post: #10
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 01:13)btraven Wrote:  This is not in direct reply to your question--that's way above my skill level--but is a comment on ppi for good printing results. I get my stuff printed at a place called Mpix. I emailed one of their tech guys awhile back about dpi and print quality. He told me that their machines--the newest and highest-of-tech Fujifilm machines--output at 250 dpi.

I've never had detectable issues with anything above 220 dpi, so I no longer adhere to the 300 rule. If I have to crop an image down to 220 or so to get the composition I want, I don't worry about it but I try to stay above that. Also, I get my enlargements done on Fuji Pearl paper. The quality difference is noticeable and, to me, worth the little extra money. You may be printing at home, so I don't know if this is helpful info. I think the 3oo dpi rule is for the pixel-peepers who examine prints with a jeweler's loupe or something.

The 300DPI rule is for printed text, because we are very sensitive to blurred edges on text.

For pure photo the rule may not be a hard DPI setting. To estimate depth of field, photographers consider that anything below 1/1800th of the image diagonal cannot be seen by someone that looks at the image from sufficiently far away to see it as a whole (this is called the "Zeiss rule"). If we make sure that this "fine detail" is at least on two pixels, this implies an image with a diagonal of 3600pixels, roughly 6MPx (which coincidentally, is the definition of the first digital cameras deemed good enough for professional use).

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Jun 1, 2014, 12:35 (This post was last modified: Jun 1, 2014 18:40 by ofnuts.)
Post: #11
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 01:34)Esper Wrote:  you read a lot, the default monitor resolution is 75dpi, but i also read thats a myth

According to Wikipedia, the ubiquitous 17", 1024x768 CRT monitor had a 75DPI dot pitch. But current displays are usually above 100DPI (my laptop display is about 120DPI).

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Jun 1, 2014, 17:06
Post: #12
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 07:34)rich2005 Wrote:  
(Jun 1, 2014 01:13)btraven Wrote:  ... I emailed one of their tech guys awhile back about dpi and print quality. He told me that their machines--the newest and highest-of-tech Fujifilm machines--output at 250 dpi.

These are not your regular inkjet printers. Photographic laser printers commonly print at 100 dots per cm (254 dpi) but the result is equivalent to a much higher density.

some info here http://www.photobox.co.uk/content/quality/technical

Very helpful, thanks.
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Jun 1, 2014, 17:21
Post: #13
RE: a question about printing
(Jun 1, 2014 12:26)ofnuts Wrote:  
(Jun 1, 2014 01:13)btraven Wrote:  This is not in direct reply to your question--that's way above my skill level--but is a comment on ppi for good printing results. I get my stuff printed at a place called Mpix. I emailed one of their tech guys awhile back about dpi and print quality. He told me that their machines--the newest and highest-of-tech Fujifilm machines--output at 250 dpi.

I've never had detectable issues with anything above 220 dpi, so I no longer adhere to the 300 rule. If I have to crop an image down to 220 or so to get the composition I want, I don't worry about it but I try to stay above that. Also, I get my enlargements done on Fuji Pearl paper. The quality difference is noticeable and, to me, worth the little extra money. You may be printing at home, so I don't know if this is helpful info. I think the 3oo dpi rule is for the pixel-peepers who examine prints with a jeweler's loupe or something.

The 300DPI rule is for printed text, because we are very sensitive to blurred edges on text.

For pure photo the rule may not be a hard DPI setting. To estimate depth of field, photographers consider that anything below 1/1800th of the image diagonal cannot be seen by someone that looks at the image from sufficiently far away to see it as a whole (this is called the "Zeiss rule"). If we make sure that this "fine detail" is at least on two pixels, this implies an image with a diagonal of 3600pixels, roughly 6MPx (which coincidentally, is the definition of the first digital cameras deemed good enough for professional use).

Excellent! Really useful info, thanks.
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